Author: mimin

Having Fun During College

Do Lots of Research

One big mistake many college students make is not doing their due diligence before planning a trip abroad. There’s a lot you need to know about your destination that can actually help you to save money. For instance, you can look up different hotel and airline options with a simple Internet search. You can use sites like Hotwire and Trip Advisor to help find the best deals for your transportation and sleeping arrangements. You can also sign up for travel newsletters like Travelzoo and Travel-Ticker, which delivers exclusive deals to your inbox.

Look for Student Deals

You’ll find countless websites online that boast the lowest rates in town, but there are only a select few that are designed to offer deals to students. You should check out sites like Student Universe and STA Travel, which have package deals and discounts designed just for the traveling student. These are available to you as long as you’re able to prove your university enrollment. You’ll also find great money-saving tips given by other traveling students.

Consider All Forms of Transportation

There are more ways to travel than by airplane and car – you should also consider other modes of getting around, such as trains, subways and buses. The cost for these transportation options will vary depending on where you’re traveling to. If you can make it to your destination by land, then consider using the bus or train instead of an airplane. Even if you find a cheap flight ticket, airlines are known to nickel and dime you with additional fees, cutting your savings substantially. So if you have trouble finding something within your budget, consider your other options.

Travel with Your Friends

Exploring the world in groups is a lot cheaper than doing it on your own. You can split the costs of everything with everyone. If you can find three reliable buddies to travel with, you can go four ways on food, hotel rooms and transportation. The only thing you’ll have to fork up is your own plane, train or bus ticket. There are also tour and hotel discounts offered if you travel with even larger groups of 10 or more. So if you have an even bigger crowd to hang out with, consider bringing them along as well.

Apply for Scholarships

Scholarships don’t just pay for education; they sometimes also help with funding trips. You can obtain these from student-oriented travel websites like STATravel.com to find them. Some are a couple hundred and others a few thousand dollars, which can come in handy either way.

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Problem That Happens On Online Learning

In recent years, professors have become more skilled and accepting of online teaching, yet, there are still a few questions and comments that continue to echo in my ear among my colleagues: What can I do to show students that I care? What do I do to make sure students feel connected to me beyond the content? How do I help students to recognize my overall concern for their learning? How do I show my emotions in an online environment?

Having pondered the above-stated concerns, I’d like to share five ways that online educators can demonstrate caring and compassion to online students.

1. In the beginning weeks of class, respond to each student individually. I find that students need the special attention as they are feeling their way in a new learning environment; moreover, I have seen clear evidence that these personal responses lay the foundation for healthy student-teacher relationships.

2. Use appropriate “feelings” phrases when students are experiencing personal issues such as death of family members, personal illness, or financial crises. Students appreciate hearing phrases like “I’m sorry for your loss”, “I’m hoping for a positive change in your situation”, or “I care about your situation”. Upon using these kinds of phrases, students always express how much the words mean to them.

3. Reach out to students you haven’t heard from with words suggesting that they are missed. Often students go “MIA” without telling their professors. Once they return, I’ve been known to say things like “we’ve missed seeing you in class”, “so happy you’re back with us”, or “it hasn’t been the same without you”. Invariably, I will get a note back expressing their appreciation.

4. When students appear to be stressed or anxious, allow yourself to become transparent. I’ve discovered that the revelation of my own stressful situations serves as a source of encouragement to students. For example, on several occasions, single mothers have shared their difficulties in balancing responsibilities related to schoolwork, children, and parents. In each case, once I reveal my story of working on my dissertation as a single parent and taking care of my mother, I notice a remarkable difference in the students’ overall willingness to move forward.

5. Mix in humor with challenging concepts and assignments. Very often, higher education students carry an overarching expectation that everything associated with learning must always be rigid and serious; however, I often take the liberty of inserting humor to soften the intensity of some of the more challenging assignments. For example, when introducing students to concepts about APA rules, I post a silly song called the APA Blues. The students find themselves singing along laughing at the lyrics, and as a result, the humor works to dismantle some of the uneasiness that may exist around the topic.

The examples described above are a few strategies I’ve used to demonstrate caring and compassion with my students over the years. As college and university professors, we must always be mindful that part of our responsibility is to ensure that students feel that we care about them not only as students, but as human beings.

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Find The Job That You Want

Most colleges haven’t gotten the message. Students want and need good jobs when they graduate. However, to accomplish that goal, they need a lot of information and guidance along the way. Both students and their parents want colleges to step up and take a firm hold of that responsibility.

As long as students and parents remain relatively silent and docile on this issue, colleges will continue to only pay lip service to this critical need. These colleges will tell their students that they are doing what they can with the limited resources that are available. And yet, large amounts of money and manpower are not needed. Only a new way of thinking and a reallocation of resources would be necessary. That’s where you come in.

Students and parents can make their needs known by forwarding the following questions to The Chair of the Board of Trustees, The College or University President and the Vice President of Student Affairs.

1. There are things that I can be doing during each semester of college, between semesters and during the summers that will help me land a good job. What are they?

2. What yearly informational classes and training sessions are currently offered to students who want to become fully prepared to land good jobs when they graduate?

3. As a ___________ major with good grades, what 10+ job titles am I most likely to be offered when I graduate?

4. As a ___________ major with good grades, and knowing the job titles I am most likely to be offered, what salary offers can I realistically expect?

5. As a ___________ major with good grades, how many employers visited our campus to recruit students with my major last year?

6. As a ___________ major with good grades, how many students with my major received job offers from the employers that visited our campus last year?

7. As a ___________ major with good grades, what is the likelihood that I will land a job that pays $50,000 or more, so I can live on my own and pay back my college loans?

8. As a ___________ major with good grades, what internships and part-time jobs are available through the college to help me gain some solid work experience in my field?

9. To help me impress potential employers seeking students with my major, what campus clubs or activities should I consider joining, participating in or leading?

10. Besides the book titled A Successful Senior Year Job Search Begins In The Freshman Year, what books and articles should I read during my first two years of college?

11. How do I find out what the best employers in my field will expect me to accomplish before they will consider me for an interview?

12. How can I differentiate myself from other qualified students in my field?

13. How many alumni who graduated with my major can you put me in touch with?

14. What is the college currently doing to ensure that more students land good jobs when they graduate?

15. What new forms of employment assistance are being offered to students this year or will be offered next year?

Answers to these questions can be posted on the college’s web site with the specifics for each major available in the Career Services Office. Only when enough students and parents express their needs and concerns will more colleges begin to investigate and adopt approaches that will help more students find success in the job market.

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Benefit Tips For Educator

This election season has proven divisive among Americans, creating deep wounds from the words that have been used. The rift between groups in America are not going to heal just because the election is over with and it will take time for the nation to recover. Now consider how this election season has affected your students. They have surely felt the impact of the negative rhetoric. Have you addressed this in your classes? More importantly, have you considered how your words as an educator influences your students and their worldview?

What you say and what you do as an educator shapes how your students view the world, how they participate in the learning process, and more importantly, your words have a direct impact on their level of motivation, determination, and persistence. Do you know the power you have given to your words right now?

As you reflect upon your work in the classroom, along with interactions you have with your students, do your words reflect what you see in your class, what you believe as a person, or what you hope your students will accomplish? While it may not seem possible to make a distinction between these perspectives, there is a difference as we all hold one primary lens through which we view our students. And during a volatile time, especially when emotions are running high, it may be difficult to override personal feelings while interacting with our students.

Now more than ever is a time to reevaluate the words we use in higher education. We can either give those words the power of influence and inclusion, or we can leave them unfiltered and create division, separation, and feelings of discouragement. What I want to share with you are strategies you can use to self-assess how you communicate with students, which I have also utilized now during a time when so many students may be feeling uncertainty or fearful about the future of our country.

Words Create Worlds

The Center for Appreciative Inquiry coined a phrase, Words Creates Worlds, and this acknowledges the influence our words can have on us and others. How do we realize the impact of our words? When there is a large-scale event, such as an election, it shows us the multiple realities that exist as people share their view of candidates and our nation. In a college classroom, words create worlds during interactions with each other – especially during class discussions. Those words are felt and internalized within the spirit of our students. Regardless of where they begin academically, or where they are at now academically, every student can continue to grow and develop. Yet an instructor can cause that spirit to flourish or become diminished based upon the words that are used.

As an instructor, consider the impact of your own views. As you read or hear the news you are going to process that information through filters you’ve created, which includes biases and opinions. If something negative has been reported, you will process it through these filters; and it may influence your worldview. The challenge is preventing negativity from influencing how you see your students and remaining neutral regardless of the rhetoric used. While you are in the classroom it is vital to remain open-minded, see individuals as people rather than groups, and remain objective and rational (rather than subjective and emotional) – if you are going to create a welcoming atmosphere.

The Connection to Learning

Learning involves more than what goes on in the classroom. It is much more than the process of reading a textbook and memorizing information for an exam. Instead, the learning process centers on what occurs in the mind as it is a cognitive activity. Cognition involves the mind receiving input, processing it, and producing some form of output. The input is the subject matter, the context provided, the instructions or criteria stated for completing the required learning activities. Cognitive processing occurs when effort is applied, energy is expended, creativity is initiated, and the intellect is engaged. The output consists of thoughts, ideas, analyses, written papers, plans, etc.

However, it is important to consider that the mind is not a machine and is influenced by feelings and emotional reactions. As students are involved in the class, they may experience negative emotions or reactions. A common emotion that students experience while working on assignments is frustration. This in turn influences and often disrupts the cognitive process, and it may discourage their creativity or reduce the effort they put into an assignment. In contrast, if students experience positive emotions and feelings while interacting with the class and their instructor – they may feel encouraged to put in more effort and become more creative.

Here is an example: An instructor hears negative rhetoric about a particular group of people on the news and through internalization of words heard, this instructor develops negative feelings about that group of people. Once in the classroom the instructor sees students who are part of this group that they hold negative feelings about and are unable to remain unbiased as they interact with those students. It is very likely that the words used while communicating with those students will then reflect that negative view, which can cause those students to feel diminished in some manner.

The Power of Your Words

When students begin a class, they have varying degrees of academic preparedness, willingness to participate, and readiness to learn. Even while they are engaged in the learning process they may have varying levels of motivation. This is where an instructor’s words can have the greatest power by shaping the disposition of your students. What I am referring to are not just the words used while presenting a lecture or answering questions during class time. These are the words used to communicate and interact with your students. For example, I have seen the most academically under-prepared students excel in many ways when it is not seemingly possible – if they have been surrounded by powerful and encouraging words. The words of an instructor create the views and perspectives that our students have about learning and their school.

How to Self-Assess Your Words

Below are some questions that you can use to self-assess your disposition, attitude, and mindset as a means of discovering what influences the words you use.

Diversity, Equality: Do you view all students as being equal, regardless of their race, religion, sexual orientation, and other characteristics used to classify individuals? Do you believe that every student has potential, or will only the academically prepared students succeed? What words do you use to describe the characteristics of your students?

Individuality: Do you see your class as one group of students or do you see individual students with unique characteristics? Here is an example: “I have Caucasians in my class” versus “John and Emily are in my class” – which one would you choose? In addition, how do you describe your students? For example, do you use words like “they” or do you refer to students individually (he/she)?

Request for Assistance: When you receive a request for assistance, what is your initial reaction? For example, do you feel happy that a student has asked for help or do you feel a sense of dread? Does the student who asked the question make a difference with regards to how you feel? You will find that how you perceive the request will influence the words you use when you respond.

Class Disposition: Do you see your class as being energized right now? Or do you see students as wanting to get through the class as quickly as they possibly can? Do your students have a positive or negative attitude about learning? In other words, do you believe that the class has a collective mood? How you see your class will have a definite impact on the words you choose when you interact with them.

These self-assessment questions will allow you to gauge what you experience and feel, which in turn will help you determine what influences the words you use while you are working and interacting with your students. Your disposition, attitude, and worldview all give power to your words, either in a positive or negative manner, and those words can either bolster or diminish the spirit of your students. I have learned that even the most seemingly casual conversation can have a direct impact on how students feel, perform, and respond to class conditions. You can cultivate words with a positive impact if you are willing to set aside your own biases and look for the best in each and every student. This disposition will help you choose words that sustain your students and encourage them to persist – even when they feel challenged.

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Why Work Experience Is Important

Students who work as they go through college with internships, part-time and summer jobs give themselves an important advantage in the job market when they graduate. Since not all working students understand how they benefit from their work experiences, it is important for them to think about their jobs as a way to support their career goals. For that to happen, students should understand five factors that improve their odds for employment success:

1. Experience – Knowing what to do and actually doing it are two different things. Employees who are experienced can anticipate problems and know how to handle the issues that crop up. They quickly get things running smoothly again and can maximize productivity. Since some skills and abilities only come with experience, employers love candidates who have already demonstrated their capabilities and work ethic in the workplace. Real world emergencies, accidents, mistakes, equipment failures and the difficulties and pressures that go with them will test any employee. The way students react to them depends on the experience and understanding they gain on the job.

2. Performance – Employers seek candidates who will perform well for them. Although doing well in the classroom is highly desirable, that doesn’t always translate into good performance on the job for every student. That’s why employers want to see or learn about a student’s job performance every place they have worked. The more positive comments they hear from previous employers, the more likely it is that they will have a serious interest in the student.

3. Reliability – Employers select employees who are reliable. They show up every day on time and are ready to work. These employees are highly productive. They regularly exceed quantity, quality and timeliness requirements. They always get the job done, even when they are unsupervised. Being someone an employer can count on is critical to employment success.

4. People – Employers are usually more interested in candidates who get along well with and are respected by others in the workplace. They know that the workplace often requires collaboration, cooperation and teamwork, in order to get the job done well. Students who get along well with coworkers and help them achieve results will be in high demand.

For students, the workplace is where they build relationships with people who can help them in the job market. There are people in the workplace who can help students gain the information and training they need to perform at a high level. Students should also look for other employees to include in their employment networks. Additionally, when students impress company executives with their performance, those executives may be willing to serve as references and may even offer students full-time jobs when they graduate.

5. Accomplishments – Employers try to hire people who learn quickly, work hard, help them make money, create harmony and efficiency in the workplace and strengthen relationships with customers. Therefore, students with Internships, part-time and summer jobs can create an impressive resumé by emphasizing their accomplishments in these areas.

Students who view college jobs as merely a source of spending money, without considering these five points, are missing out on important opportunities to make themselves highly attractive to the employers with the best jobs at graduation. The most effective students always use those work experiences to learn something new, perform at a high level, meet new people, establish relationships, add to their list of accomplishments, build their brands and enhance their reputations.

Categories: Education

The Meaning Going Into College

As I watched this A4 sized paper which happens to be my University Degree certificate in the computer Science and Engineering department of October 2016, a plethora of memories just came as a silver lining to my mind. This is merely because this single floating paper has a full conglomeration of different feelings of happiness, hard work, perseverance, tiredness and teamwork behind.

As the clock ticked to memories of three years ago, I can still vividly remember how the postman was among the most awaited person during the May-June month of 2013. Indeed the most awaited news- the approval of courses applied at the tertiary level from the University Of Mauritius was on the way. Those who have undergone through this waiting shall reckon, but believe me, no feelings can be better than those first stumbling steps to the university, a yard which shall bring in one’s life, an ever-growing platform to blossom your parent’s dreams, your beloved ones, or simply the one in the mirror dream.

As the day goes by, the same stumbling feet gain momentum and March forward to achieve and shape the best version of themselves for a better world of tomorrow. Since Success is the prime reason for nearly all university students, CPA- Cumulative Point Average is at the top of the priority bucket list. We, as students, we tend to grab each and every bits and pieces which can leverage the CPA. Actually, at university many seminars, workshops, talks or even competitions are organized at national or even international levels for the student’s personality development. Indeed these organized academic and non-academic activities builds up the student personality and adds on the student CV-Curriculum Vitae However it is very saddening to notice that there are still students having those convergent mindset of “Is this going to impact my CPA? If the answer turns out to be a ‘NO’, then OK I am not going for it, it is not important.”

However my message to the readers is very simple, university life is not only a CPA accumulating platform, but a live performance platform where non-academic fields, communication, interpersonal and teamwork skills are also built up. Also what we treasure from university is a knitted relationship of sharing and togetherness with our peers. If and only if one can understand and create a momentum amidst one’s academic and non-academic life, university life shall indeed be a really memorable lifetime achievement and enjoyment.

After all, we are the best pivot and driver of the seven lettered word-SUCCESS. It is undeniably true that good grades /CPA, Job security are the prime reason a student attends university, but why not also collect and build up a good personality, as what we always carry with us is not our A4 size CV but our personality.

The adage goes by personality to man is what perfume is to a flower.

The reason of why companies are laying emphasis on Communication, Business and Interpersonal skills is because students tend to forget the university key concept of TEAMWORK. Indeed a good team player already earns some bonus when it comes to first passing the interview, second grabbing a job and most important sticking to that particular job. These are mainly in the IT department where most jobs are carried out in teams combining each and every team member contributed work.

Anyone who is a team-player is self-securing and paving a better tomorrow of himself or herself in this Mauritian competitive job market. Being an ex-student I can personally understand the morose feeling that one may feel like “OK! Now I quit!” But now when I look back to those days I realize that working to make both ends work marvelously was one of the best decision I had ever taken. After all what we, Mauritians students fail to cherish sometimes is what others are dreaming of living on other spheres of the globe.

In short my message to my readers are just to live university life in a diverging spectrum instead of just converging the ray to academic achievement. After all, university like other phases of life is one where one need to cherish and enjoy all of its facets however stumbling or difficult the path might be. I finish with the all-times favourite adage which goes by “You must be a lotus, unfolding its petals when the sun rises in the sky, unaffected by the slush where it is born or even the muddy water which sustains it.”

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Tips To Get Scholarships

Scholarship providers look for certain things to make sure the candidate qualifies for the scholarship. If you want to get a scholarship, make sure you meet the criterion. Besides, you can use the tips given below to increase your chances of qualifying for the award.

Tip 1: Use concrete examples

If you are going to include an abstract in your answer, make sure you use concrete examples for illustrating your point. Actually, the scholarship sponsors are in search of someone who meets their strict criterion. They don’t just rely on unsupported statements.

Tip 2: Make Sure You Are Eligible

Before applying, you should read the directions and requirements carefully to ensure that you are eligible. Remember: your application will be rejected if you are not eligible.

Tip 3: Identify the Goals of The Sponsor

You should try to identify the goals of the sponsor. Do they want the people to show interest in a certain field? Maybe they are looking for some business leaders and researchers for future needs. If you succeed in identifying their goals, we suggest that you emphasis these goals in your application to increase your chances of qualifying for the award.

Tip 4: Follow The Directions

You must follow the directions. In other words, your application should have all what is required. Your application should be complete as an incomplete application is likely to be thrown away. Make sure the application doesn’t have spelling or grammar errors.

Tip 5: Put Together a Great Resume

Make a list of your accomplishments as this will help show your strengths to the reviewers. Aside from this, you provide the writers of the letters of recommendation with a copy of your resume.

Tip 6: Respect all deadlines.

You should set a deadline for yourself, and make sure the deadline is at least a couple of weeks away. You can use this time to review your application to make sure it is free of errors.

All parts of your application should reach the reviewers in time. The important parts include different documents, such as transcripts and letters of recommendation. What you need to do is make sure that the reviews of your application will have enough time to include the necessary things.

Tip 7: Make a Copy

It’s important to make a copy of your packet to serve as a backup. If your application doesn’t reach the office due to some unknown reason, you can reproduce and resend it without any problem.

On each page of your application, your name and social security number should be visible. If your application documents are not identifiable, they may get lost. Therefore, you should take your time and make some copies of all the documents, just to be on the safe side.

So, if you want to qualify for the sponsorship, we suggest that you follow these tips. Getting a scholarship is not easy as there is a lot of competition involved. But you can set yourself apart from the crowd by following these tips and taking the right steps. Hope this helps.

Categories: Education

How To Overcame Your Student

What do you believe students remember most about the courses they have taken? Is it the course, the school, their grades, their instructors, or something else? As I reflect upon the courses I took as a student, which wasn’t too long ago, I do not remember many of the textbooks I’ve read, discussions I was involved in, videos I watched, or written assignments I had to complete. What I do remember are some of my instructors – those who inspired me and encouraged me to perform my very best, and those who taught me what I should never do as an instructor. In other words, the most vivid memories I have involved those instructors who stood out for extraordinarily outstanding instructional methods, especially those who took time to develop a personal connection with me, and those who were extremely ineffective in the classroom. Whether instructors invoke the best or the worst emotional reactions, it most always creates a lasting impression for students.

I have learned from my work with faculty development that it is not possible for a school to guarantee that every instructor hired, especially as an online adjunct, is going to create optimal learning conditions and have a disposition that is agreeable with all students. I have reviewed hundreds of online classes and found that contractual faculty requirements can never fully dictate what an instructor must to do excel in their role. If instructors are meeting the basic requirements, they will likely retain their position – but that doesn’t mean they will be memorable to their students. Many instructors I’ve worked with are not even concerned with the perceptions of their students, demanding compliance from them whether or not they are well liked.

Within the field of distance learning, which is my area of higher education expertise, students rarely know who their instructors are before the class begins. Many online schools do not have a searchable faculty directory and that means students rarely know who the instructors are until they read a posted introduction. Once their classes have concluded, students may never be assigned to those same instructors again as adjuncts are usually teaching a specific class – depending upon enrollment, availability, rotation, seniority, and other factors. Whether or not instructors will be assigned another class with the same students, the cumulative effect of the interactions they do have has a potential to make a difference in their learning experience. Every instructor can have a positive impact on their students, whether or not it is immediately realized.

Academic Educator vs. Subject Matter Expert

From my experience, I have discovered there are two distinct perspectives of the work that educators perform. One perspective is a result of the traditional role of an educator, who is working full time at a college or university and has dedicated their career to the development of their instructional practice. They are working to become a teaching expert and usually have strong subject matter expertise, along with a highly developed academic background. This type of educator has dedicated their career to helping students learn, conducting research, publishing, and furthering their scholarly expertise.

The other perspective of an instructional practice is based upon those educators who are working as adjuncts. Online teaching was a thriving career up until a few years ago, when the for-profit industry came under intense scrutiny. Approximately ten years ago, there were more jobs than adjuncts and now that trend has reversed. The primary difference between adjuncts in this field and traditional instructors is that online adjuncts are often hired not because they were academics, rather they are practitioners in a field related to the subject being taught. When someone teaches a class without an academic background, their primary focus is often on the need to manage a class and complete the facilitation requirements.

What does this mean for the classroom learning experience? Is one type of educator more effective than the other? I believe that it is a matter of perspective. An academic educator is going to better understand the learning process and how to educate adults. A subject matter expert, as an instructor, may be able to provide the necessary context for learning and that means either educator can be effective. I chose to bridge the two types of educators by choosing postsecondary and adult education as the major for my doctoral degree, to add to the business and business management subject matter expertise I already had acquired. However, that only tells part of reason why my work with students has made a difference for them as knowing how adults learn is part of the equation but not the complete answer.

How You Can Make a Difference for Your Students

Regardless of which type of background you have as an educator, I have discovered that what makes a difference for students is the attitude and disposition an instructor holds about learning, along with their ability to see a potential for growth in every student – and how they are able to relate to and work with their students. Below are three areas for self-assessment that you can use to determine if you have had, or could have now, a positive impact on the learning and development of your students.

#1. Do you do what you say you will do? What you say to your students matters, along with what you say you will do and then what you actually do. For example, do you state that you are easily accessible and responsive to their needs, but then you are slow to answer questions or unwilling to provide assistance that actually helps them? When you state that you care about their academic needs, how do you show it?

Students may forget what you state or what you have written, but they will usually remember what you have done. As an example, if a student has asked a question and received a timely response, especially one that is meaningful and demonstrates a caring tone, they will remember that and likely seek assistance again when needed. It goes back to the saying that “actions speak louder than words” – and I’m certain this is something you have experienced yourself.

#2. Do you want to make a short term or long term impact? Have you ever taken time to consider the impact of your teaching practice? If so, what kind of impact do you want to have on your student’s academic life? When your goal as an instructor is to complete the required facilitation duties and assist students only when they request help, the impact that you will have on their learning experience will likely be short-term and soon forgotten. In contrast, if you are cultivating relationships with your students and you are focused on their academic success and ongoing persistence, your impact is likely to be more long-term or memorable.

You may not know the full extent of how you have helped your students if you work with them for only one class; however, the long-term effect is one that will be transformative as they continue working towards completion of their academic goals. You may also never know about the impact you have made if your students are not directly responding to you. But the smallest of gestures made by you, done with a genuine concern for the well-being of your students, may influence them in a positive manner both now and in the future.

#3. Are you working to develop sustainable connections with your students? A follow up question for you to consider is this: Do you stay in touch with students, even after the class has concluded? For many online adjuncts that I have worked with this question seems like a foreign concept. How can you develop lasting connections when you interact with students for just a few weeks? Why would they ever remember you? Perhaps you have learned this lesson, or may you have not, but even something as simple as being willing to take extra time to explain challenging concepts, provide additional tools and resources, or craft engaging and meaningful feedback, may be enough to start a connection. For example, I am still in contact with students today who stated it all began with the level of feedback I provided and how it helped them grow.

I also utilize social media to connect with students and that creates discomfort for some educators, and even some schools, as this platform can be utilized in a manner that is not suitable for academic interactions. What I have done is to develop a following on Twitter as a means of sharing academic related resources and staying connected to a global base of students and educators. Students have also viewed my LinkedIn profile and for that reason I do not post personal information or political perspectives as I want it to remain professional in nature. I know this can be a challenging practice for some educators to follow and that is why many schools do not encourage instructors to share social media information within their classes.

What Can or Should Students Expect?

Should students expect the best from their instructors, if the school promises they are highly qualified and will provide a positive learning experience? I used to think that ineffective educators make a poor representation of their school and could create a negative impression for their students; however, it seems that students have almost become used to experiencing a wide range of instructors and they have become proficient with tuning out those who they perceive are ineffective. Some students have even taken to social media to express their frustrations, and there are websites that allow them to provide both feedback and ratings for instructors. I have looked at those websites and it is difficult to determine if the instructor was at fault or the students are not receiving the outcomes they expected. Whatever the reason, there was something that was left unresolved and that created frustration on the part of the students.

This is similar to end-of-course instructor evaluations that students are often given to complete. I have observed a very low return rate with online students, and the reason for completion of the form was often related to being extremely satisfied or dissatisfied with the course outcomes. I know that some schools base teaching assignments on the evaluation outcomes and it is a source of frustration for many instructors – especially when they have done their best and still have an occasional unhappy student. But what I have also noticed is that the more I focus on what I am doing in the classroom, rather than on trying to make students happy so they will give me a good rating, the better my evaluations have been overall. When I am determined to make a difference for the learning experience of my students, over time the number of positive responses tells the entire story of my teaching effectiveness.

Whether you are interested in developing academic or subject matter expertise as an educator, the most important aspect of your instructional practice needs to be on the strategies you use to meet the developmental needs of your students. They are only going to persist and realize their potential if you encourage them in a supportive manner. Your disposition will influence the tone of what you say and what you write, and this can build up, empower, and motivate your students to do well. You can make a difference for your students by looking at your role as more than a series of tasks to complete, and nurturing a proactive, positive approach to how you interact with your students. Even if you never know the full extent of how you have made a positive impact, you will likely develop some long term connections that remind you of the value you brought to the classroom – and that will make your hard work feel very rewarding.

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Tips To Make Your Student Being Better Everyday

When you see a new class of students for the first time, or interact with a group of online students for the very first time, what is your initial feeling about your students? Do you consider the expectations of these students, or are you more focused on helping them become acclimated to the class? What are your hopes for your students? I understand that on the first day of class there is a lot to accomplish from a procedural perspective; however, do you consider the point of view of your students and what they might be thinking as they first interact with you and others in the class?

When I am assigned a new online and it is the first day, even after working in the field of distance learning for over eleven years, I still think about the hopes that students hold for their degree program overall – and how this class is part of their overall plan. I know that each and every one of them have potential to learn, they have a range of experiences to draw upon, and their knowledge about the course topics may also be vastly different among them. As their instructor, I am being inserted into their academic lives, usually without their pre-approval, and I must somehow help all of these students find a way to function well both individually and together. My hope is that all of them will gain something of value from the class, and that they are able to improve upon and/or refine their academic skills. I do not want them to just get by in the class, I want them to discover how well they are capable of performing when encouraged to do so.

What I hope for and what students for may never fully align, especially if they never develop an interest in the class or a connection with me. Students are not obligated to tell me what they hope for or want from this class, rather it is up to me to discover their developmental needs and establish a productive working relationship with them. This is part of the art of teaching and as any educator knows, it takes time and practice. The more you learn how to work with students, the better you become at discovering what brings out the best in them. What I have discovered is that if I want students to excel and perform their best, I need to teach them self-empowerment. This does not minimize my responsibility to them, rather I am helping them learn to be self-reliant and to be able to sustain their ongoing progress from one class to the next.

Students and Self-Empowerment

I am really not a fan of clichés, and I am aware of how the word empowerment and self-empowerment has been over-utilized for quite some time; however, there is merit in the essence of the word when describing a scenario that involves an educator who is teaching students to be self-directed. In higher education, my goal is to have a student-centered classroom environment and that is in direct contrast to primary education where you will find a teacher-centered environment. I do not want to dispense knowledge to students or tell them what they need to learn. I want to find resources that will help them discover knowledge they need and how to develop the academic skills that are required. This can be challenging when you consider the expression that it can be difficult when you “don’t know what you don’t know” – or in other words, students may not know how to assess their skills. However, I never assume that students lack the desire to want to be involved and simply want to be told what to do.

When I am working with students, my goal is not to give them the answers or a grade or correct their papers for them. I want to work with them and provide resources, instill confidence within them that they can learn, increase their sense of motivation, help coach them to move in the right direction even if they make the same mistake more than once, provide meaningful guidance when I return feedback to them, and offer assistance that is actually helpful for them. Self-empowerment can be thought of as having self-reliance, which means that students know where to turn for answers and resources when they have a question or need assistance – and that includes being able to help themselves. It aligns with the principle of andragogy, or teaching self-directed adult learners who are active participants in the process of learning.

Empowerment Instructional Strategies

I have implemented the strategies below to help teach self-empowerment with my students. These methods were effectively utilized in online classes, regardless of the subject matter, and developed as a result of my knowledge of adult education and teaching practice. My goal was to teach students that they could try any of these methods at any time, with or without my assistance, as a means of becoming self-reliant or empowered to improve upon their own performance.

#1. Skillset Inventory: Develop a list of the most important skills that you believe your students should possess at any given time as related to their academic performance. For example, the most common skills could include critical thinking, academic writing, etc. You could provide a rating scale, an actual form, guidelines, or any other parameters. This activity can be implemented as part of a one-on-one activity with your students or given to your students for the purpose of self-reflection.

#2. Midpoint Summary: With online classes, my students tend to be non-traditional, working adults who are reading when they can – and often from their phones when they can access their materials from mobile devices. What this means is that the days of taking notes with a traditional notebook and pen are no longer a reality for most students, and many students do not take notes at all. I have found that a mid-week or midpoint summary is a very good method of testing retention and comprehension. This can help you (if you ask the student to submit it) and the students to determine if they are actually understanding the materials they are studying during the week.

#3. Feedback Follow Up Essay: I understand that developing feedback for a large class takes quite a bit of time, and asking an instructor to spend even more time reviewing follow-up submissions may seem to be too much; however, there is still something to this approach you may want to consider – only because most students will not return the follow up essay. My approach has been as follows: When I have reviewed an average, below average, or poorly written paper, I will return it to the student and ask them if they would like to re-write it and return it to me not for a new grade – but for an opportunity to learn from the feedback provided. I have found that those students who are highly motivated are the ones who will actually take me up on the offer and re-write the essay. To simply teach self-reliance, you could instruct students to re-write the essay without submitting it, incorporating the feedback received, use it as a learning experience.

Those are just three of the strategies I have used to teach self-empowerment. In my classes I also talk about the power of a positive mindset. I provide positive motivational quotes in all of my weekly announcements and I believe that if I can create a nurturing and welcoming environment, one where I am truly working to support and bolster the morale of my students – they are going to feel empowered, motivated, and engaged. As a result, they are going to perform better. Does every student respond to these attempts? Not always. However, my goal is to do everything I can so that I can say I have done at least one thing to have an impact on each and every one of them in some manner while they were in my class – whether it was a matter of being responsive, present, engaged, showing I cared, or providing feedback that matters.

Path About Pharmacy Way

Introduction

In the healthcare industry, there are a lot of career options available for the interested candidates wanting a career dream in the field of medical sciences. The job of a pharmacist is full of responsibilities in helping the people’s with the best of healthcare medicines facilities.

The pharmacy profession is always a choice of preference for the medical aspirants. There are many other medical or para-medical courses available for interested students.The profession of pharmacy provides various job opportunities in the different field too. Now a day’s pharmacy industry and profession are experiencing rapid changes due to advanced technological innovations and ideas sweeping across the world. Hence these changes give better oppor­tunities to the pharmacy profession and it is imperative to evolve a Pharmacy academic program that suits the basic thirst of the nation like providing medicines at affordable prices, community health care etc.

Education background

To get to see yourself for a career of the dispensing of medicines, and interacting with the people healthcare, an amazing career option, a medical aspirant needs to get good grades in the subjects of physics, chemistry, biology, and English to get it from the reputed school around the world.

Duration of the course

The duration of the pharmacist’s courses in the form of bachelor’s and master’s degree courses last for 4 years and 2 years respectively. A medical candidate has to never underestimate the influence, what the pharmacy field can offer you with. The career of pharmacy is about to help with the busy life schedule and quick delivery of the medicines. With this, the career is compelling to provide you with the best of options to groom well in the field with the equal participation in the different programs and studies.

Work experience

Undertaking a placement or gaining relevant work experience will greatly enhance your employability. It shows potential employers that you are enthusiastic and that you can apply the skills you have learned during your course to the workplace. It is also possible to gain experience in a hospital pharmacy, although this may be unpaid work shadowing and last from a few days to a few weeks. Experience in a retail environment or voluntary work in a healthcare setting will enable you to develop valuable skills including customer or patient care and will increase your knowledge of over-the-counter medications.

Skill set required

• Interpersonal skills.
• Ability to work well as part of a team.
• computation.
• Problem-solving skills and the ability to think clearly and methodically.
• Time management and organizational skills.
• Commercial awareness.

Colleges and Universities

There are various medical universities in the world providing the best of healthcare services, but searching through the student perspective, they are the one always looking for the best of colleges offering the quality of education at affordable fee structure and affordable accommodation. If a student is able to avail the above, then the best option for him is to avail the education in the pharmacy field from the foreign university.

Career options

• Pharmaceutical Industry- QA/QC Produc­tion/Manufacturing
• Regulatory Affairs (filing new drug applica­tion etc)
• Marketing (Medical Representative)
• Drug Inspectors
• Post graduation Studies (M.Pharm /Ph.D.)
• Clinical Research
• Insurance Sectors
• Various certificate courses in Management, Industrial applications
• Can establish own Pharmaceutical Company.
• Can become a member of Pharmacy Council of India.

Future Study

Pharmacy graduates who want a career in scientific research and development may study for a Ph.D., in fields such as biomedical or chemical science. Graduates who decide that they want to pursue careers outside pharmacy may undertake a relevant postgraduate course to broaden their skills and increase their knowledge of other areas.