Month: February 2018

Tips To Make Your Student Being Better Everyday

When you see a new class of students for the first time, or interact with a group of online students for the very first time, what is your initial feeling about your students? Do you consider the expectations of these students, or are you more focused on helping them become acclimated to the class? What are your hopes for your students? I understand that on the first day of class there is a lot to accomplish from a procedural perspective; however, do you consider the point of view of your students and what they might be thinking as they first interact with you and others in the class?

When I am assigned a new online and it is the first day, even after working in the field of distance learning for over eleven years, I still think about the hopes that students hold for their degree program overall – and how this class is part of their overall plan. I know that each and every one of them have potential to learn, they have a range of experiences to draw upon, and their knowledge about the course topics may also be vastly different among them. As their instructor, I am being inserted into their academic lives, usually without their pre-approval, and I must somehow help all of these students find a way to function well both individually and together. My hope is that all of them will gain something of value from the class, and that they are able to improve upon and/or refine their academic skills. I do not want them to just get by in the class, I want them to discover how well they are capable of performing when encouraged to do so.

What I hope for and what students for may never fully align, especially if they never develop an interest in the class or a connection with me. Students are not obligated to tell me what they hope for or want from this class, rather it is up to me to discover their developmental needs and establish a productive working relationship with them. This is part of the art of teaching and as any educator knows, it takes time and practice. The more you learn how to work with students, the better you become at discovering what brings out the best in them. What I have discovered is that if I want students to excel and perform their best, I need to teach them self-empowerment. This does not minimize my responsibility to them, rather I am helping them learn to be self-reliant and to be able to sustain their ongoing progress from one class to the next.

Students and Self-Empowerment

I am really not a fan of clichés, and I am aware of how the word empowerment and self-empowerment has been over-utilized for quite some time; however, there is merit in the essence of the word when describing a scenario that involves an educator who is teaching students to be self-directed. In higher education, my goal is to have a student-centered classroom environment and that is in direct contrast to primary education where you will find a teacher-centered environment. I do not want to dispense knowledge to students or tell them what they need to learn. I want to find resources that will help them discover knowledge they need and how to develop the academic skills that are required. This can be challenging when you consider the expression that it can be difficult when you “don’t know what you don’t know” – or in other words, students may not know how to assess their skills. However, I never assume that students lack the desire to want to be involved and simply want to be told what to do.

When I am working with students, my goal is not to give them the answers or a grade or correct their papers for them. I want to work with them and provide resources, instill confidence within them that they can learn, increase their sense of motivation, help coach them to move in the right direction even if they make the same mistake more than once, provide meaningful guidance when I return feedback to them, and offer assistance that is actually helpful for them. Self-empowerment can be thought of as having self-reliance, which means that students know where to turn for answers and resources when they have a question or need assistance – and that includes being able to help themselves. It aligns with the principle of andragogy, or teaching self-directed adult learners who are active participants in the process of learning.

Empowerment Instructional Strategies

I have implemented the strategies below to help teach self-empowerment with my students. These methods were effectively utilized in online classes, regardless of the subject matter, and developed as a result of my knowledge of adult education and teaching practice. My goal was to teach students that they could try any of these methods at any time, with or without my assistance, as a means of becoming self-reliant or empowered to improve upon their own performance.

#1. Skillset Inventory: Develop a list of the most important skills that you believe your students should possess at any given time as related to their academic performance. For example, the most common skills could include critical thinking, academic writing, etc. You could provide a rating scale, an actual form, guidelines, or any other parameters. This activity can be implemented as part of a one-on-one activity with your students or given to your students for the purpose of self-reflection.

#2. Midpoint Summary: With online classes, my students tend to be non-traditional, working adults who are reading when they can – and often from their phones when they can access their materials from mobile devices. What this means is that the days of taking notes with a traditional notebook and pen are no longer a reality for most students, and many students do not take notes at all. I have found that a mid-week or midpoint summary is a very good method of testing retention and comprehension. This can help you (if you ask the student to submit it) and the students to determine if they are actually understanding the materials they are studying during the week.

#3. Feedback Follow Up Essay: I understand that developing feedback for a large class takes quite a bit of time, and asking an instructor to spend even more time reviewing follow-up submissions may seem to be too much; however, there is still something to this approach you may want to consider – only because most students will not return the follow up essay. My approach has been as follows: When I have reviewed an average, below average, or poorly written paper, I will return it to the student and ask them if they would like to re-write it and return it to me not for a new grade – but for an opportunity to learn from the feedback provided. I have found that those students who are highly motivated are the ones who will actually take me up on the offer and re-write the essay. To simply teach self-reliance, you could instruct students to re-write the essay without submitting it, incorporating the feedback received, use it as a learning experience.

Those are just three of the strategies I have used to teach self-empowerment. In my classes I also talk about the power of a positive mindset. I provide positive motivational quotes in all of my weekly announcements and I believe that if I can create a nurturing and welcoming environment, one where I am truly working to support and bolster the morale of my students – they are going to feel empowered, motivated, and engaged. As a result, they are going to perform better. Does every student respond to these attempts? Not always. However, my goal is to do everything I can so that I can say I have done at least one thing to have an impact on each and every one of them in some manner while they were in my class – whether it was a matter of being responsive, present, engaged, showing I cared, or providing feedback that matters.

Path About Pharmacy Way

Introduction

In the healthcare industry, there are a lot of career options available for the interested candidates wanting a career dream in the field of medical sciences. The job of a pharmacist is full of responsibilities in helping the people’s with the best of healthcare medicines facilities.

The pharmacy profession is always a choice of preference for the medical aspirants. There are many other medical or para-medical courses available for interested students.The profession of pharmacy provides various job opportunities in the different field too. Now a day’s pharmacy industry and profession are experiencing rapid changes due to advanced technological innovations and ideas sweeping across the world. Hence these changes give better oppor­tunities to the pharmacy profession and it is imperative to evolve a Pharmacy academic program that suits the basic thirst of the nation like providing medicines at affordable prices, community health care etc.

Education background

To get to see yourself for a career of the dispensing of medicines, and interacting with the people healthcare, an amazing career option, a medical aspirant needs to get good grades in the subjects of physics, chemistry, biology, and English to get it from the reputed school around the world.

Duration of the course

The duration of the pharmacist’s courses in the form of bachelor’s and master’s degree courses last for 4 years and 2 years respectively. A medical candidate has to never underestimate the influence, what the pharmacy field can offer you with. The career of pharmacy is about to help with the busy life schedule and quick delivery of the medicines. With this, the career is compelling to provide you with the best of options to groom well in the field with the equal participation in the different programs and studies.

Work experience

Undertaking a placement or gaining relevant work experience will greatly enhance your employability. It shows potential employers that you are enthusiastic and that you can apply the skills you have learned during your course to the workplace. It is also possible to gain experience in a hospital pharmacy, although this may be unpaid work shadowing and last from a few days to a few weeks. Experience in a retail environment or voluntary work in a healthcare setting will enable you to develop valuable skills including customer or patient care and will increase your knowledge of over-the-counter medications.

Skill set required

• Interpersonal skills.
• Ability to work well as part of a team.
• computation.
• Problem-solving skills and the ability to think clearly and methodically.
• Time management and organizational skills.
• Commercial awareness.

Colleges and Universities

There are various medical universities in the world providing the best of healthcare services, but searching through the student perspective, they are the one always looking for the best of colleges offering the quality of education at affordable fee structure and affordable accommodation. If a student is able to avail the above, then the best option for him is to avail the education in the pharmacy field from the foreign university.

Career options

• Pharmaceutical Industry- QA/QC Produc­tion/Manufacturing
• Regulatory Affairs (filing new drug applica­tion etc)
• Marketing (Medical Representative)
• Drug Inspectors
• Post graduation Studies (M.Pharm /Ph.D.)
• Clinical Research
• Insurance Sectors
• Various certificate courses in Management, Industrial applications
• Can establish own Pharmaceutical Company.
• Can become a member of Pharmacy Council of India.

Future Study

Pharmacy graduates who want a career in scientific research and development may study for a Ph.D., in fields such as biomedical or chemical science. Graduates who decide that they want to pursue careers outside pharmacy may undertake a relevant postgraduate course to broaden their skills and increase their knowledge of other areas.

Why Alumni Does Not Donate To Their College

Graduating from college is one of life’s major accomplishments. It should be celebrated ecstatically with all of an alumni’s family and friends. As several months roll by, graduates contemplate their career, or perhaps just a get a job to earn money before starting a career. But, at the same time, most graduates get the “call.” It’s not from an employer interested in hiring, but a representative from your school’s alumni office asking for a donation!

A donation already? Surprise!

Universities and colleges really want to build on their already long donor list. They don’t care about that huge amount of tuition money that a new alumni may be still paying off for the next 20 years. When colleges do call, they try to get the most from you: “Would $50 be enough? What about $100 to be on our “Silver Standard Group? Or, $500 to be on our Gold Standard Group?”

Today alumni are giving less to their school than they were twenty years ago, primarily for seven reasons.

1. According to the August 31, 2016 post of the Washington Examiner, the main reason most alumni aren’t giving money to their college is because they would use the money to give to worthier charitable causes. Besides, most alumni believe their college doesn’t need the money as much.

2. Colleges and universities charge a lot of money. For a four-year education the bill can go up as much as $280,000. Many college students are in serious debt because of such steep tuition costs. Still, colleges have the nerve to ask for money to many who graduated recently.

3. Young graduates probably neither have a job nor have decided on a career. Specific jobs can be difficult to find. Careers take time to plan and implement. Many feel they should save the money they have already.

4. Colleges ask for donations to increase the reputation of the school. According to the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, donating to university helps the reputation of the school. However, many schools base their reputation, less on academics and more on sports, especially in football and basketball. Tickets for both sports sell for quite a lot of money. There is such a loyal fan base that I wonder if the fans even know their big winning schools are schools at all. Overall, at the larger schools, alumni believe the school will still be standing in the next decade or so because it exists to win a national championship.

5. Many alumni won’t “give back” due to less than satisfactory academic and student life experiences. They feel no loyalty to the school because it is based on connectedness between the student and the school. These alumni typically don’t especially care how well it does financially now or in the future.

6. Universities and colleges aren’t the learning centers they used to be. According to the National Review website, they have become places where professors are teaching indoctrination of liberal ideas rather than on fewer facts. Many schools have become institutions of unrest due to racial chaos. Plus, more political correctness is demanded at many schools. College education is a completely different animal today than before.

7. Public and many private universities are already heavily funded by government dollars. Tuition and donations fund large private colleges. However, smaller colleges can manage alone with the enormous tuition costs for each student, even though they have fewer costs. As a result, many greedy private colleges and universities own such heavy endowments in the millions and billions of dollars that will never completely be used up.

Do you donate to your school? These seven reasons might make you change your mind about giving to your school. Colleges and universities can come off as greedy and insensitive to unfulfilled financial needs, especially if they call for money one or two months after graduation. Today, fewer alumni are committed to giving to their school due to a large shortage of money because of high tuition costs. The school really doesn’t need a donation because it already has a superior reputation. Some alumni have little or no school loyalty because their overall experience of their education and student life was negative. Education has been so watered down by political correctness, personal opinions and fewer facts. If these trends continue, alumni will continue giving much less money to their schools.

All About Doctorate Degree

Completing a doctorate degree is a significant accomplishment. This achievement represents the culmination of hard work, extensive critical thinking and research about the chosen field of interest, and the result is a contribution made in the form of new ideas, thoughts, plans, methodologies, and/or actionable recommendations.

Consider in contrast, the number of individuals who complete their coursework but not the dissertation portion of the doctorate program. Current research shows there is an unprecedented number of individuals who are at the “all but dissertation” or ABD phase, and it is unknown what weight or influence a doctorate degree with the initials ABD in the title may have, if any at all.

Also consider that a doctorate degree, in academia, is the highest level of academic achievement. As those of you know, it is also the costliest of academic degrees as well. In fact, the total number of people within the United States who possess a doctorate degree is less than 10%. Within academia, doctoral candidates are generally told they will become scholar practitioners, and they are encouraged to continue their research and practice what they have studied.

For those individuals who complete a doctorate degree, there is an expectation that their careers will change in some manner, especially given their new status as a scholar practitioner. I remember completing my Ph.D. approximately seven years ago. I chose Postsecondary and Adult Education as my major, since I worked in both the corporate world and academia, and I believed I could easily find an advanced career in either environment. Unfortunately I have learned, like many others, earning a doctorate degree does not always change a person’s career and that leads to my important question: What is the real value of a doctorate degree?

The Journey of a Doctoral Graduate

I have worked in the field of higher education now for over 12 years. Prior to working in academia, I worked in corporate America for approximately 20 years. However, I have not remained exclusively in academia as I have also accepted consulting and contract positions that have allowed me to work with organizational development and instructional design projects. As to my work in academia, most of my positions have been online teaching and online leadership roles, working with for-profit institutions.

I am certain most of you may know about the state of the for-profit industry and how most of these institutions have had significant enrollment drops. Some institutions have even been forced to close. There are new non-profit institutions taking over the market; however, the leader in this market is known for low pay and a reputation for offering correspondence-style courses, which will lead to accreditation issues at some point.

What all of this indicates is that adjunct online teaching jobs are becoming fewer year by year, and full-time positions are almost non-existent. When I began in 2005 there were more jobs than instructors and the “gold rush” began. Now that has been reversed and those of us with doctorate degrees are competing with thousands of adjuncts who have master’s degrees for just a few jobs. If you believe a doctorate degree gives you a competitive advantage, you would be just as disappointed as I am on a daily basis.

Finding Employment in Higher Education

The online application format has taken away the human element from the application process and being a scholar practitioner no longer matters when filling out online forms. The fact I have a degree that less than 10% of the United States population has makes no difference to an automated online application system, and I am talking about positions in the field of academia.

Can you imagine having a doctorate degree (Ph.D. Postsecondary Adult Education), with 11 years of experience in higher education (including roles such as Chief Academic Officer and Dean), and not having a competitive advantage with institutions of higher education? Sure, we could blame the automated online application system; however, that is only part of the issue since it is the institutions who are implementing these systems.

More importantly, do you believe that someone with my education and experience is treated any differently as to how my application is handled? Now let me clarify, I do not expect white glove treatment. However, I earned a doctorate degree (Ph.D.) and that is a degree which is supposed to be the most respected and highly positioned degree in academia. Yet I receive the dreaded automated human resources emails that do not even have the courtesy to address me by my name.

What is even worse? The changing nature of jobs within academia. Here is an example. There is a newer non-profit institution, which is operating as a for-profit. This institution advertises hundreds of jobs and if you look on salary review websites you will be shocked with how low the pay is for these positions. However, what is even more shocking are the qualifications for senior leadership positions. One senior leadership position was advertised with the following requirements: master’s degree, three years experience, and some higher education experience preferred but not required.

I should clarify that the positions I am referring to above are remote or online based positions. I have also looked into employment with traditional colleges and universities; however, my doctorate degree was obtained from an online university and traditional schools tend to reject anyone with degrees from online schools. In addition, I would not qualify for a teaching position which requires earning tenure and other positions within traditional schools are also few and rarely advertised.

Finding Employment in Corporate America

The next option for me to explore is Corporate America as I have over 20 years of experience in this field and I have continued to work contract positions involving organizational development, along with training and development. I also have experience as a Manager of Training and Development.

How do you believe Corporate America responds to someone with a doctorate degree in Postsecondary and Adult Education? The answer is: not very well. I am either viewed as someone who may be too academic, too over-qualified, or a variety of other factors I have yet to ascertain. I have yet to find a training and development department that is open to the idea of having someone with a doctorate degree help lead their employees.

I also have the same hurdles to face with Corporate America as I do with academia and it is the online application forms. If you cannot obtain a name of someone to contact, such as a hiring manager or even a recruiter, you are left to the mercy of an algorithm to determine your future fate with that company.

So where does that leave me now with a doctorate degree, seven years after obtaining a Ph.D.? I am definitely not where I thought I would be. I am writing articles and blog posts, conducting research, and picking up contract positions as I can find them. Job searching has become a full-time job, and I thought that making a financial investment in a degree to work in a field I love would have brought me further along than this and I know there are not guarantees in life.

However, I am still left wondering about the value of a doctorate degree if institutions of higher education cannot support it through employment opportunities and do not value persons holding these degrees when they apply for positions. I understand there are economic factors, and there always will be, yet what has happened to the field of academia? Institutions of higher education continue to enroll students into doctorate programs and tell them they are scholar practitioners. Will the value of the doctorate degree eventually become so diluted that it only looks good on paper, or have we already reached that point? It seems I cannot answer my own question yet and perhaps one day I will, as I continue on my doctoral journey.

Categories: Education

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